Monday, January 5, 2009

I Fucking Hate the Apple Store

Here I am, sitting at the one available computer, waiting for an appointment that will never come. I came and explained to some guy my situation and that someone at Apple Corp. had arranged a stand-by appointment for me--which they don't do unless several of the scheduled appointments haven't confirmed and would therefore clear up some time for people like me--with instructions to call her if there would be a long wait, but he had no idea what I was talking about and she (said employee) didn't pick up her phone. I am not here to buy a new laptop or check out an iPhone; I'm here to ask the "geniuses" why the hell my hard drive keeps crashing. I don't treat my laptop like a precious fabrege egg, but I also don't toss it around like some two-dollar whore. But whatever, I've been here for a half hour without any subsequent discussion with any of the dozen people working here. I am leaving in ten minutes without solace but with my shitty non-working laptop. I hate Apple, I hate the Genius Bar, and I hate stupid Apple Corp. employees who don't keep their promises and make me shlep to Ninth Avenue for no reason. 

-Josh

P.S. Stupid Apple store guy, stop making brief eye contact with me and then pretending to not see me. We've met, and you know why I'm here. I hate you.

6 comments:

ctrl said...

Elerath and Shah [1] report between 15-60% of drives considered to have failed at the user site are found to have no defect by the manufacturers upon returning the unit. Hughes et al. [2] observe between 20-30% “no problem found” cases after analyzing failed drives from their study of 3477 disks.

About 100,000 disks are covered by this data, some for an entire lifetime of five years. The data include drives with SCSI and FC, as well as SATA interfaces. The mean time to failure (MTTF) of those drives, as specified in their datasheets, ranges from 1,000,000 to 1,500,000 hours, suggesting a nominal annual failure rate of at most 0.88%.

Schroeder et al [3] found that in the field, annual disk replacement rates typically exceed 1%, with 2-4% common and up to 13% observed on some systems.



[1]Jon G. Elerath and Sandeep Shah. Server classliability case study: Dependence upon flyheight and quantity of heads. In Proceedings of the Anings of the Annual Symposium on Reliability and Maintainability, pages 151 – 156, January 2004.

[2]Gordon F. Hughes, Joseph F. Murray, Kenneth Kreutz-Delgado, and Charles Elkan. Improved diskdrive failure warnings. IEEE Transactions on Reliability, 51(3):350 - 357, September 2002.

[3]http://usenix.org/events/fast07/tech/schroeder/schroeder_html/index.html

Jess and Josh said...

Um, wow, thanks for the info. I'll bet the study doesn't account for "hastily throwing laptop in your tote bag" as a cause of drive failure, though.

-Josh

The College Blog Network said...

Sorry to hear about your crappy experience. I can relate though, I love Apple but everytime I'm in their store I can't help but feel that creepy 'cult' vibe crawling up my spine. Reminds me of the simpsons episode:

Simpsons: MApple Store

Jess and Josh said...

Yes! That was a great episode. And yeah, they're just soooo friendly but not really that helpful and the geniuses at the Genius Bar aren't actually geniuses because they just tell me they need to send my laptop to Wherever People Will Fix It, Utah, which I already knew. Also, there's always like one girl working at every Apple store. But just one!

-Josh

David said...

I'm a Mac, and I'm a PC.

Joseph Rhodes said...

Right on. You couldn't have expressed my feelings of frustration toward the Apple store any better. You can still be a shill even if you work for a "cool" company.

Also, the 80 GB Seagate drives in MacBooks are known to be crap. Happened to mine, too, and I treat mine fairly gingerly.

http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/07/11/27/apple_aware_some_macbooks_contain_flawed_seagate_drives.html